employment prospects in swiss

Foreign students may work a maximum of 15 hours per week during their studies, and up to 100 per cent during semester breaks. This must be reported in all cases to the responsible immigration authorities. Students from outside the EU/EFTA region may only start working six months after the beginning of their studies. In these cases, the employer must submit a corresponding request for taking up employment to ensure that an employment check can be carried out. Following this, the immigration authorities can issue a work permit.

 

3. Shaking work
A part-time work permit will be given after students have stayed for 6 months in Switzerland, except if the part time work taken is closely related to the field of study studied by students. Post-graduate students with a Bachelor’s degree from an overseas University who will work on campus in Switzerland where they study — no need to wait up to 6 months. Secondary work is limited to 15 hours per week during the semester of college and there is no time limit if students work during semester breaks. A part-time work permit is issued several weeks after the filing date. International students who graduate from Swiss universities are allowed to stay and seek full-time employment in Switzerland for 6 months from the date of their graduation.
It should be noted, students need to pay attention to the provisions of part time work in each city (a kind of province) in Switzerland because not all cities allow students to work part time.

3. Shaking work
In accordance with Swiss government regulations, international students from outside the EU 17 (European Union) / EFTA countries will need a permit (work permit) if they want to work part time. Work permits are obtained after the employer submits an application form to the Office for Economy and Labor in each city. In addition there must be a consent letter from the University where students attend school which ensures that part-time work does not interfere with student studies.
A part-time work permit will be given after students have stayed for 6 months in Switzerland, except if the part time work taken is closely related to the field of study studied by students. Post-graduate students with a Bachelor’s degree from an overseas University who will work on campus in Switzerland where they study — no need to wait up to 6 months. Secondary work is limited to 15 hours per week during the semester of college and there is no time limit if students work during semester breaks. A part-time work permit is issued several weeks after the filing date. International students who graduate from Swiss universities are allowed to stay and seek full-time employment in Switzerland for 6 months from the date of their graduation.
It should be noted, students need to pay attention to the provisions of part time work in each city (a kind of province) in Switzerland because not all cities allow students to work part time.

3. The opportunity to work part time for 15 hours per week during the study period.

International students should not expect to find work in Switzerland
By Gaurav Singh, swissinfo.ch student blogger

Even internships are hard to access for those from outside the EU.

After multiple rejections, Gaurav has reconciled himself to the fact that, barring a miracle, he will not find a job in Switzerland.

Most Indians when applying to a university in Europe or North America think about finding a job there after their studies and perhaps settling down there. To be honest, I also had the same thoughts. Those who say that they want to go back to their country must be lying. But after living in Switzerland and experiencing the reality of finding a job, I feel it is better not to expect anything when it comes to job prospects.
Switzerland is a European country but is not in the European Union (EU). Most of the trade and services in Switzerland are tied to the EU. Hence, Switzerland has many bilateral agreements with the block, including freedom of movement and work. Due to this many EU citizens come to Switzerland in order to enjoy a high standard of living and higher salaries. This is not possible for those outside the EU, like Indians for example. The extra paperwork required, including proving that no Swiss or EU citizen could be employed for the role, greatly diminishes any interest in job applications sent by non-EU citizens.

I have applied to countless jobs, but when most of the recruiters realise that I am not a European citizen, they usually don’t reply. Those that do state that “unfortunately, they cannot proceed with my application as they found someone better”. This phrase will be the most common one encountered by non-EU applicants when they do get a response from the recruiter.

Personally, I do not apply for any random job. If I find the job is suitable for me and the advertisement corresponds with my profile only then do I proceed with an application. Sometimes, it is hard to believe that the company found so many people better than me and I did not even get a chance to be interviewed. It is heartbreaking but it is the reality.

This kind of rejection is not just for permanent jobs but is true even for an internship. Most companies prefer to have an intern who can become a permanent employee after finishing studies. Since the procedure for applying for a work permit for a non-EU citizen is a lengthy and tedious process many prefer not to proceed with such internship applications.

Sometimes, I feel that the people working in some reputed companies do not even deserve to be there. This feeling was triggered by an incident when I was looking for an internship after finishing the first year of my Master in Finance course. I was curious to know if a local bank in Neuchâtel offers internships for students. As I couldn’t find the contact details of their human resources department, I sent an email to general inquiries. Instead of shedding light on their internship programme I received information about how to open a bank account!

A screenshot of the bank’s response asking me to furnish documents to open a bank account.

(Gaurav Singh)
If you are coming to Switzerland to study then come with the intention of getting an education. If you expect more, you will be disappointed.

For more blog posts and information on studying in Switzerland visit our dedicated page Education Swiss Madeexternal link.

Home >> Study Abroad >> Switzerland >> Jobs for Students
Jobs in Switzerland for International Students

Jobs in Switzerland for International Students
Students at the Rolex Learning Centre (the library & study area of L’Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)

Switzerland is an expensive places to live in, even if the tuition fees of universities are affordable. It would cost you anywhere between CHF 11,500 to 18,000 (INR 7,93,145 – 12,41,445) per year to live here.

International students studying in Switzerland have the option of going for part-time jobs in order to earn a little extra to support various expenses. In fact, the student residence permit allows for profit-earning activity, as long your university provides a statement confirming that your employment will not prolong the length of your studies.

Jobs for students in Switzerland
As an international student in Switzerland you are legally allowed to work for not more than 15 hours per week (i.e. around 2 hours per day.) During the vacation period you may work full-time but only if you’ve been living in the country for at least 6 months. You can earn anywhere between 20 – 26 CHF an hour, which would mean you can easily cover your living expenses if you land a steady part-time job in Switzerland. Typical job options available include those as a teaching assistant in universities or lab assistants etc.

Job Hunting

Jobs can be found in local newspapers, specialized magazines and specialized websites.
Links to finding part-time jobs:

http://www.academics4business.ch/
http://www.students.ch
http://www.sbf.admin.ch/eracareers/jobs.html
It is easier to find employment in the large urban centers like Geneva and Zurich. Each university has a job placement office that provides information on student employment.
As there is no central job searching tool covering all Swiss universities, it is necessary to consult each university’s databases. You will find direct access to each university’s database of job vacancies under the section working in research.

Career services of Switzerland’s Universities

EPFL, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne
ETHZ, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich
Università della Svizzera italiana
University of Basel
University of Bern
University of Fribourg
University of Genève
University of Lausanne
University of Lucerne
University of Neuchâtel
University of St.Gallen
University of Zürich
USEFUL RESOURCES
Study Abroad
Education Loans
Distance Education
Correspondence Courses
Online Education
Parent’s Corner
Teacher’s Corner
Student’s Corner
Exam Results & Schedules
World’s Top Universities
Work in Switzerland
AuthorJemma Smith, EditorPostedSeptember, 2018
Switzerland is home to a stable economy, high salaries, low unemployment rate and a plethora of multinational companies. Discover how to start your Swiss adventure

With a population of 8.5 million, Switzerland is a relatively small country. Yet despite this and the recent challenges of the economic crisis, it boasts one of most stable economies in the world, with an impressive unemployment rate of just 2.4%.

With its an excellent quality of life, high wages and low tax rates it’s no surprise that the country is increasingly popular with job-seeking graduates.

Known for its coffee, chocolate, cheese and cuckoo clocks, almost two-thirds of Switzerland’s territory is dominated by the Alps. This beautiful scenery, coupled with the county’s modern cities, provides plenty for you to explore in your free time. As it’s a multilingual nation, you’ll also be well placed to pick up a second or third language, which is sure to impress on your CV.

Jobs in Switzerland
Many foreign workers, especially highly-skilled ones, successfully find work in Switzerland.

However, with a relatively small labour market it can be difficult for foreign graduates to find work. Competition for jobs is fierce, especially more recently as Swiss employers have begun to favour locals over international workers. International workers may have more luck in major Swiss cities such as Basel, Bern, Geneva, Lausanne and Zurich rather than in smaller, rural areas. However, living in Swiss cities is costly: Zurich and Geneva are regularly voted among the most expensive cities in the world but this should, at least partly, be counterbalanced by the country’s high wages.

The Swiss economy is dominated by the service sector. Switzerland also has a thriving tourism industry, with hospitality jobs available throughout the country. Those interested in careers in banking and insurance will likely find opportunities in Zurich, and those aiming for a career in chemicals or pharmaceuticals will find vacancies in Basel.

POPULAR GRADUATE JOBS
Banking
Engineering
Insurance
IT
Pharmaceuticals

Switzerland also houses a number of multinational companies including:
Adecco
Credit Suisse
Glencore
Nestle
Novartis
Roche Group
Zurich Insurance.